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Ian O'Byrne

The palace is not safe when the cottage is not happy. - Benjamin Disraeli In issue of my newsletter. You should subscribe at wiobyrne.com/tldr/ #civilian

#111

Ian O'Byrne

All cruelty springs from weakness. - Seneca In this week's issue of TL;DR - wiobyrne.com/tldr/ #honesty

#110

Ian O'Byrne

I see my path, but I don't know where it leads. Not knowing where I'm going is what inspires me to travel it. - Rosalia de Castro #identity In this week's issue of TL;DR: wiobyrne.com/tldr/

Ian O'Byrne

Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. - Martin Luther King, Jr. In this week's issue of TL;DR - wiobyrne.com/tldr/ #truth

Ian O'Byrne

How to debate

1 min read

We've all been in that situation where a informal conversation quickly becomes a discussion and then we find ourselves in a debate.

A debate is a wonderful opportunity to flex your intellectual muscles and can lead to a deeper level of understanding for all individuals involved.

A proper debate requires intellectual nimbleness, rigor, and attention. There is a need to remain open-minded and cognitively flexible to account for variations in the truth, situation, or the debate itself.

Debate also requires an understanding of the facts. It also requires an understanding of what you don't know.

 

There are several keys to engaging in a debate:

  • Know your facts. Know what you don't know.
  • Put yourself in your opponent's shoes and understand their views.
  • Don't recite & regurgitate their views. Give it your spin.
  • Find a common ground.
  • Consider and concede when you're wrong.
  • Stay calm and civil.

 

Keep in mind that it is important for these keys to be followed by both parties in a debate.

 

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Ian O'Byrne

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth. - Marcus Aurelius

Ian O'Byrne

I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts. - Abraham Lincoln

Ian O'Byrne

The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival. - Aristotle

2 min read

In our lives, the number one priority should be the expansion of our own self awareness. We need to become aware, accept, and in some cases adjust the truth about our selves and our world.

To examine this narrative and build self-confidence, we have the possibility of reversing that narrative and speak from expertise as the person we would like to believe that we are. We are who we think that we are.

We can achieve this through the following:

  • Cease automatically and arbitrarily defending your own viewpoints as being binary (i.e., right/wrong, or black/white). This relentless attack/defense stops us from receiving new ideas.
  • Problematize and reassess your concepts, values, belief systems, assumptions, defenses, goals, hopes, and truths.
  • Understand, evaluate, and revise your real needs and motivations.
  • Learn to trust your intution. 
  • Observe your mistakes and try to correct them. we learn more about ourselves through this process.
  • Love yourself and others.
  • Listen without prejudice and evaluation. Train yourself to listen to WHAT someone is saying without auditing their expressions.
  • Recognize what you are defending most of the time.
  • Understanding that the end result and your unlocked awareness will provide the means and motivation needed to enact further change in your life.

Ian O'Byrne

If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear as it is, infinite. - William Blake

2 min read

One of the major stumbling blocks to changing perceptions and awareness of these "truths" that we've manufactured is that we do not want to recognize that we are wrong or mistaken. Furthermore, we do not want to admit to others (or ourselves) that these mistaken perceptions have distorted or modified our lives.

To counteract this, it is important to periodically challenge our beliefs and viewpoints. We need to problematize these perspectives and question their validity. We need to question their role and relevance in our lives.

In a normal state, our personality undergoes a constant process of reorganization. We routinely review, prioritize, and in some cases reject viewpoints and perspectives. In a misguided or neurotic state, the personality clings to beliefs that may be false or distorted. In these situations, a major crisis or event is required to force the individual to recognize alternative viewpoints and perspectives. 

If your mind and personality has been programmed or conditioned to accept and distort concepts and values, you develop a lifestyle and actions to support or justify your version of truth.You make assumptions that events are true or casual when neither is valid. You seek to prove these aspects to be correct, to make the facts fit your perspective. 

You need to identify a means to wipe these away and cleanse your perspectives.

Ian O'Byrne

The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival. - Aristotle

2 min read

In consideration of our present levels of awareness, we often have difficulty idenifying and becoming aware of these perspectives. Furthermore, it serves as an impediment and blocks us from making advancements in our own lives.

There are several reasons why we find this to be difficult.

  • What we picture or imagine about the world is based on our beliefs and perceptions about truth. This version of truth may be faulty or distorted, but our minds control our actions and reactions informed by this perception of truth.
  • It is easier to give reasons for not changing, or vouch for what it is not possible to change, as opposed to making the change. Making the change is harder than simply making excuses.
  • In our daily interactions and decisions, we seek out experiences that support our values systems and perceptions of truth. We ignore, reject, or forcibly avoid beliefs, perceptions, or behaviors that are inconsistent with our narratives of the world.
  • We have built and programmed our minds and bodily systems to respond on ways that react and reify to the truth and perspectives we've developed. We have conditioned ourselves to feel, act, and react to the narratives that we've established for ourselves.

Through conditioning of our mind and body, and as informed by sociocultural perspectives, we've created these narratives that we cannot break out of. Many of us cannot recognize or identify the narrative in the first place. For those of us that do recognize the narrative and try to problematize it, this process seems unhealthy and harmful to our very being.